To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow.
— Audrey Hepburn
 
 
 
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Philosophy

A well designed garden begins with the requirements of the homeowner. After that, the site will dictate the feel of the garden, the plant selection, and the use of space. The architecture of a home is important too when developing a design that is cohesive from the hardscape to the plantscape.

I firmly believe in starting with the soil and improving its overall health.  Without healthy soil, there won't be healthy plants - ornamental or edible.

The "right plant, right place" is age old garden wisdom which I use to guide my designs.  I pull from a large palette of appropriate plants from California, South Africa, Australia, Chile and the Mediterranean basin.  With this selection I am able to design water wise gardens that reflect a wide variety of styles.  Japanese influenced, cottage, rose, Mediterranean, modern, meadow, and native gardens are all possible. 

 

∙ Why plant ANYTHING

Gardening is an extension of your home and personality.  It is art that shows appreciation for the inter-connectivity of life.  A garden expresses your style in a way nothing else can. 


∙ Low water Means More than Cacti

I am adamant about establishing soil health prior to installing a garden. A soil in good tilth will hold onto water and nutrients and encourage roots to grow deeply. This helps plants weather our long, hot, dry summers. You CAN have a lush garden filled with color and life all year long with exceptionally low water needs. Even roses!


∙ Why not Artificial grass?

Artificial grass is great for many applications, such as dog runs and putting greens.  When used appropriately, it can be very rewarding. 

Unfortunately, it is not beneficial in any way for the soil beneath it.  It absorbs heat and becomes scorching hot in direct sunlight, leaving everything underneath even more baked and prone to runoff.  

However, if you would like a large swath of green, options are available.  I use ground covers as well as exceptionally drought tolerant sods for turf substitutions.

 
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